Hyperthyroidism Secondary to Metastatic Choriocarcinoma: Case Report
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Keywords

hyperthyroidism
thyrotoxicosis
choriocarcinoma
gestational trophoblastic disease
gestational trophoblastic neoplasia

How to Cite

Parra, G. A., Bolívar, I. C., Molina, J. F., García, J. A., & Guevara, H. (2019). Hyperthyroidism Secondary to Metastatic Choriocarcinoma: Case Report. Revista Endocrino, 6(2), 121–126. https://doi.org/10.53853/encr.6.2.488

Abstract

Although Graves’ disease continues to be considered the most frequent cause of clinical hyperthyroidism in pregnancy, the disproportionately high production of human chorionic gonadotropin (HCG) as occurs in gestational trophoblastic disease (TSG), is another possible cause, due to analogy between this (HCG) and TSH. We present the case of a 23-year-old patient who complained of pelvic pain of moderate intensity, respiratory symptoms, tachycardia, tremor, asthenia and weight loss; who was diagnosed with metastatic choriocarcinoma to the lung, with associated thyrotoxicosis, requiring chemotherapeutic and antithyroid management. This case is presented, since hyperthyroidism secondary to choriocarcinoma is a rare pathology but it must be diagnosed and treated opportunely since it depends on the patient’s prognosis.

https://doi.org/10.53853/encr.6.2.488
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References

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